Camino de Santiago: When to Walk?

IMG_0879Someone recently asked me for my thoughts on when to walk Camino de Santiago. It’s a great question. I’ve walked the French route, Camino Francés, so it’s the only route I can comment on but there are lots of other paths to Santiago. Each one brings its own set of considerations. I need to point out that I’ve walked 800km, from St. Jean Pied de Port in France, over the Pyrenees, and across Northern Spain. For some people that’s “all of it” but for others it’s only a section of the journey. The length of the walk is relevant when you have to think about weather,  accommodation, and such.

It’s very tempting to tell you about the weather and the general conditions when I walked. That’s easy to recount but not necessarily very helpful. Instead, here are my tips for trying to decide when is *your* best time to walk.

In no particular order…

  • Get informed. Talk to someone you know who’s already walked a camino – any camino. If you don’t know anyone in your inner circle, see if your friends or colleagues know anyone, ask at your local outdoor shop, or see if there are camino talks in your area where you can meet people who’ve got some first-hand experience. Ask them what route they took and when they walked (what year and months). Why did they choose that route, and was it considered quiet or busy at that time? What was the weather like? Was it typical for that time of year? Some people may have experienced unusually wet summers or surprisingly warm winters – find out when others walked, why they chose that time, and what their overall experience was.IMG_1116
  • Remember that everyone is different. One person’s best time to walk  is another person’s worst. I’ve met people who walked in the July & August heat, and others who walked when there was snow and ice. With the right gear, preparation, and common sense, they all survived just fine. So, take some time to reflect on your own happy medium in terms of temperatures, rainfall, sunshine…that kind of thing.cropped-img_0748.jpg
  • Look at your life. How much time can you give to the trail and when? I’ve met lots of school teachers who, because of their profession, could walk only at certain, very specific times of the year. Do you have similar constraints in your life? If so, how will they impact on your journey? Let’s say you have two weeks vacation (clearly not a teacher, ha ha ha), you need to take a transatlantic flight, walk camino for ten days, then fly home and jump straight back into work and your daily routine. Doable? Sure – lots of people do it because it’s the only way they can experience camino at all. Question is: is this how you want to do it? Take the time to reflect on what you can realistically give, and when. IMG_1266
  • Do some real-time research. I spent a bit of time reading through the Camino de Santiago Forum, here: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/. It’s a great resource full of up-to-date information about weather conditions, accommodation details, transport links, security topics…you name it. The “up-to-date” bit is relevant here. Already, my experience of camino is outdated because things have changed quite a bit since I walked. Getting information from people who are there right now is really helpful, and hopefully will help you in your own decision making.IMG_1051
  • Consider your route. The Camino Francés is hugely popular but it’s not the only route to Santiago. According to the pilgrimage office statistics page, the figures confirm that the numbers of people on camino are growing every year. In 2013 in the office received 215,879 pilgrims. In 2017, the office received 301,036 pilgrims. That’s quite a jump. Did they all walk the Camino Francés? It’s unlikely, but the growing numbers have an impact on everything – from the structural integrity of the trail to the availability of hot water in hostels. When you’re trying to decide when to walk, also think about what route you have in mind. Maybe you automatically assume you’ll walk the Camino Francés, but have you thought about how busy it may be? Consider the other routes too: they may be a better option for you given the time of year you want to walk, the amount of time you have to offer, and the experience you seek.IMG_0917
  • Don’t try to be perfect. Unexpected things happen on camino and in life, and there is no time of the year that is perfect for a walk such as this. For all the research you do, know when to pull back from it, too. Give yourself some breathing space and know that you cannot control every single detail, so don’t even try.IMG_1133
  • Last but certainly not least, follow your inner voice. It’s very, very easy to get caught up in research and preparation but that’s all “head stuff”. Pay very close attention to the “heart stuff” and “gut” too, because these parts of ourselves can be remarkably clear when it comes to making decisions. Give yourself the time and quiet space to notice how you feel and to listen to your inner wisdom. In my own experience, the call to walk camino was quite clear and I found it impossible to shake off the feeling that I needed to walk from early September until mid October. I tried talking myself into waiting until the following spring so I would have more time to save money, do some training, and do some research. The gut said “Nooooooooooo!” and the heart said it too. So, my decision to go walk 500 miles wasn’t what-you-would-call logical, but I am proud I heeded my own inner voice. I heartily encourage you to do the same! 🙂IMG_0735Whatever you decide, enjoy it  – all of it! In the grand scheme of things, deciding when to walk a camino is a “first world problem” and isn’t one to agonize over. We are remarkably privileged to have the health, wealth, and mobility to even consider such a thing. Count your blessings and celebrate it all. x

4 thoughts on “Camino de Santiago: When to Walk?

  1. This is very timely, my wife and I have decided to walk the Camino (in 2020) but because of her lesser fitness, we decided on the shorter Camino Portuguese starting in Porto (~240km) following the Coastal Route and to do it in September. I used the forum you mentioned to get the information I needed and am happy with what I have learned.

    I don’t know if I’m agreeing or disagreeing with you but sometimes, thinking and planning can make you want to back out and, from mu bike touring experience where I’ve almost backed out because things weren’t lining up perfectly, I’ve just said, “stuff it, I’m going and will deal with the consequences as they happen”. So, do the research, recognize that weather and conditions at a particular time are just averages and that you might encounter extremes at either end and as long as you aren’t compromising on safety and health, just go for it!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I hear you and agree with you, Julian!
      I found the forum very helpful but I agree that trying to plan the perfect experience means we go nowhere. Like you, I had to trust that I would figure things out as I went along and I think it’s a good philosophy for life.
      Sounds to me like you have the right approach with planning your camino so Buen Camino to you both and I hope your preparations between now and then are inspiring and fun!

      Liked by 1 person

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